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Standing on the Shoulders of Sholem Aleichem


READ ABOUT YIDDISH  CINEMA





Visions, Images and Dreams: Yiddish Film Past

& Present
(Holmes & Meier, 2011)



Revival of Yiddish Cinema

(Tablet Magazine)

January 2011


   YIDDISH DANCE & MUSIC




with DVDs subtitled by...
Matthew Kanig
Samuel Norich
Moishe Rosenfeld

Nahma Sandrow

Jeffrey Shandler





YIDDISH FOR CHILDREN!



Pripetshik Sings

A Yiddish
Sing-Along
--------------------------------------------


The Golem
(in French)

The 1936 French/Czech Classic




ALMONDS AND RAISINS:

A HISTORY OF YIDDISH CINEMA---  ON DVD!!




A CLASSIC FROM BELGIUM

 

Welcome to: yiddishvideo.com, where you can find DVDs of the Yiddish film classics, many with new subtitles & new translations.


A Brief History

by Eric A. Goldman




Yiddish cinema began as a means to convey Yiddish theater to the far ends of Europe. In Soviet Russia, it became a powerful medium for Jewish expression in a Communist realm that first encouraged it, then later demanded ideological conformity. Throughout the 1930s, it continued as a creative force, both in the United States and in Poland— a source for entertainment and a bulwark against assimilation. After World War II, Yiddish cinema provided relief and escape to those in need of comfort. Throughout the first half of the 20th century, Jewish life, culture and language were extolled as a check against the perceived threats to the Jewish world. But within a few years of the war’s end, with the loss of a majority of native Yiddish speakers, the arrival of new forms of entertainment like television, and a post-Holocaust world Jewry more comfortable in society, Yiddish cinema ceased to be the dynamic cultural medium that it had been. By 1950, Yiddish movies all but ceased being made, but over these last fifteen years there has been a renaissance.



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French filmmaker Jean-Gabriel Davis takes us on a journey across Europe to search out places where Yiddish continues to be spoken today.